Fender guitar amplifier serial number dating

Jerome Bonaparte Squier, a young English immigrant who arrived in Battle Creek, Michigan, in the latter part of the 19th century, was a farmer and shoemaker who had learned the fine European art of violin making. Victor Squier started making his own hand-wound violin strings, and the business grew so quickly that he and his employees improvised a dramatic production increase by converting a treadle sewing machine into a string winder capable of producing 1,000 uniformly high-quality strings per day.He moved to Boston in 1881, where he built and repaired violins with his son, Victor Carroll Squier. Squier violin strings, banjo strings and guitar strings became well known nationwide and were especially popular among students because of their reasonable price. Squier Company in early 1965, shortly before Fender itself was acquired by CBS in May of the same year.with a front panel that had a rectangular grill cloth with rounded corners and looked much like a television of that era.In 1953 the cabinet designs were changed to the so-called "Wide Panel" design, with a 5 inch wide tweed covered panel above and below a wider swath of grill cloth.

The process that went into figuring all of this stuff out over 6 years and countless owners of vintage Fender amps is hands down an amazing story.

In 1982, the Squier brand was reactivated by Fender to become its brand for lower priced versions of Fender guitars. S.-trained violin makers and is often referred to as "the American Stradivarius." Victor returned to Battle Creek, where he opened his own shop in 1890. With a limited market for violins in Battle Creek, however, Squier astutely sought relationships with national music schools and famous violinists.

Squier guitars have been manufactured in Japan, Korea, Mexico, India, Indonesia, China, and the United States. As his business grew, Squier moved the company to 429 Lake Ave. Up to 1900, the best violin strings were made in Europe.

Combined with what we saw with dating a tweed Fender Champ by the tube chart and speaker code, I’m feeling pretty good that all of the various dating methods point to early 1959 for my amp.

I wish I could say that I figured all this out on my own.

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